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Offline rclad  
#1 Posted : Thursday, September 7, 2017 6:11:11 PM(UTC)
rclad

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Here's the 2018 call sheet for Sportsman: Sportsman Call Sheet 2018.doc (30kb) downloaded 38 time(s).

Please review and let me know if there are any errors. I'd like to start programming my radio to call this out for me, since I often have to fly without a caller available. Thanks!
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
thanks 2 users thanked rclad for this useful post.
Toby W. Silhavy on 9/8/2017(UTC), RVC on 9/9/2017(UTC)
Offline rclad  
#2 Posted : Thursday, September 7, 2017 6:30:59 PM(UTC)
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Oops! Figure 4 may actually be called a Reverse Shark Tooth. I'll post a corrected call sheet, if someone can confirm that.
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
Offline Bill Teeter  
#3 Posted : Thursday, September 7, 2017 9:59:40 PM(UTC)
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#2 - no such thing as a half loop - Immelman - 2 of 4 entry

#4 - Reverse Shark's Tooth or Reverse Shark for short

# 9 - Reverse Teardrop (45 degree entry makes it Reverse)

#10 - I call that a Reversing P Loop as opposed to a Reversing Whole Loop
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Toby W. Silhavy on 9/8/2017(UTC)
Offline rclad  
#4 Posted : Thursday, September 7, 2017 11:44:11 PM(UTC)
rclad

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Thanks, Bill.

Also, second 3/8 loop in Reverse Shark is a push, not a pull.

Here's the revised call sheet: Sportsman Call Sheet 2018.doc (16kb) downloaded 21 time(s).
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
thanks 2 users thanked rclad for this useful post.
Toby W. Silhavy on 9/8/2017(UTC), Steven Brentson on 9/8/2017(UTC)
Offline Toby W. Silhavy  
#5 Posted : Friday, September 8, 2017 12:09:04 AM(UTC)
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Greg, awesome work! A lot of sportsman guys will appreciate this
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rclad on 9/8/2017(UTC), Mark Thurman on 9/8/2017(UTC)
Offline Steven Brentson  
#6 Posted : Friday, September 8, 2017 3:22:40 AM(UTC)
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For the shark, I don't call the angles "loops" even though technically they are. I like to refer to the first angle as a "hard 45". This is to avoid ambiguity between a regular 45 and 135 shown in the figure. For the second angle, it's simply a "push to vertical". In that case, there's no other option than to go down, so no need to be more specific.

Lastly, on the 2x8, you may want to dictate a direction of roll since you're also dictating the 3/4 roll in the cross-box humpty. You can go either in or out. "Two-of-eight to the left" would take you out in schedule B, for example. Between those two figures, the 2x8 and 3/4 rolls will always match direction. The 1/2 roll direction in the humpty is not required.

Edited by user Friday, September 8, 2017 3:39:58 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Add direction of roll suggestions.

Offline rclad  
#7 Posted : Friday, September 8, 2017 9:32:30 AM(UTC)
rclad

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Thanks, Steve. I like brevity, too!

And thanks to the author of the 2017 Sportsman Call Sheet. I just did a copy and update.

Here's a cleaned up version of the 2018 Sportsman Call Sheet: Sportsman Call Sheet 2018.doc (28kb) downloaded 23 time(s).
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
thanks 1 user thanked rclad for this useful post.
Toby W. Silhavy on 9/9/2017(UTC)
Offline Joe Layne  
#8 Posted : Friday, September 8, 2017 11:43:33 AM(UTC)
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Thanks for doing the work Greg, I will replace mine with this. BigGrin
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Toby W. Silhavy on 9/9/2017(UTC)
Offline rclad  
#9 Posted : Friday, September 8, 2017 12:00:56 PM(UTC)
rclad

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You're welcome, Joe.

To be consistent with the other figures, I tweaked my figure 5, Cross Box Humpty Bump, (Form B) to read as follows:
"Center box, pull to vertical, center 1/2 roll, push ½ loop to vertical, center ¾ roll (left), pull to exit upright." (Form C is similar.)

The file is saved as an older Word doc, so hopefully everyone can tweak it to suit their needs.

I can't wait to try it out this weekend! BigGrin
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
thanks 1 user thanked rclad for this useful post.
Toby W. Silhavy on 9/9/2017(UTC)
Offline Bill Teeter  
#10 Posted : Friday, September 8, 2017 9:25:16 PM(UTC)
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Just intended as a helpful comment - eventually as you gain experience you will want to get away from "call sheets" and learn to call directly from the Aresti. Make notations as you wish on the Aresti rather than writing it out on a separate sheet.

This is especially true for Unknowns and if you are asking an experienced pilot in the upper classes to call for you. They will most likely want to see the Aresti to help you position maneuvers. It is hard to visualize positioning from a written call sheet.

If someone hands me a written sheet and asks me to call I always have the Aresti in the other hand so I can see the flow and give advice as to spacing and how to position the maneuvers.

I write the name of the maneuver and indicate directions I want to go - especially for cross box stuff.

Please take this as intended - a positive suggestion - as you get more experienced work on using the Aresti and get rid of separate call sheets BigGrin
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Doug Pilcher on 9/8/2017(UTC), Ron Graham on 9/8/2017(UTC), rclad on 9/8/2017(UTC), Toby W. Silhavy on 9/9/2017(UTC), Dangerous Dan on 9/9/2017(UTC), djmoose on 9/9/2017(UTC), Earle Andrews on 9/9/2017(UTC)
Offline Silver Fox  
#11 Posted : Sunday, September 10, 2017 9:30:15 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: rclad Go to Quoted Post
Here's the 2018 call sheet for Sportsman: Sportsman Call Sheet 2018.doc (30kb) downloaded 38 time(s).
Please review and let me know if there are any errors. I'd like to start programming my radio to call this out for me, since I often have to fly without a caller available. Thanks!
Hello there Greg....
I am surprised that no one has advised you that you WERE in fact correct, when you called Figure #2 a "Half Loop."

Pilots can call figures what they recognize so that they can comprehend it when on the line in front of judges. At the same time, the "OFFICIAL" name should not be relegated to the back bench and new pilots should be aware of when they are correct....... So.... Just so that you know...... Figure #2 is actually a Half Loop.

To confirm this, all we have to do is to take a look at the Aresti Catalog (those that have it) on FAMILY 7.2.
FAMILY7.jpg (49kb) downloaded 21 time(s).
Hope that helps to know that you were right in the first instance.
Wayne


Timing........ has a lot to do with the outcome of a Rain dance.!
www.sewbusy.com
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rclad on 9/10/2017(UTC)
Offline rclad  
#12 Posted : Sunday, September 10, 2017 5:34:01 PM(UTC)
rclad

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Originally Posted by: Bill Teeter Go to Quoted Post
Just intended as a helpful comment - eventually as you gain experience you will want to get away from "call sheets" and learn to call directly from the Aresti. Make notations as you wish on the Aresti rather than writing it out on a separate sheet.

This is especially true for Unknowns and if you are asking an experienced pilot in the upper classes to call for you. They will most likely want to see the Aresti to help you position maneuvers. It is hard to visualize positioning from a written call sheet.

If someone hands me a written sheet and asks me to call I always have the Aresti in the other hand so I can see the flow and give advice as to spacing and how to position the maneuvers.

I write the name of the maneuver and indicate directions I want to go - especially for cross box stuff.
...


Thanks, Bill. These are good tips.

I'm sure to experienced IMAC pilots, written call sheets look like ungainly training wheels, but the exercise of writing does serve a useful purpose. Especially to new pilots like me. Writing helps me to think more deeply about the subject and pick it apart. For IMAC sequences that means thinking about each element and how it connects with the next. For cross box maneuvers, as was pointed out above, roll direction is related between the figures. I didn't see that until I was writing it out. Of course, if I had a stick plane in front of me and just "flew" the sequence, that might help as much or more than writing.

Anyway, I had the opportunity this weekend to call some Unlimited Unknown practice sequences directly from the Aresti for Ray Morton, and that was extremely hard to do well! Brevity is the key. There is no time for unnecessary verbiage. I don't think anyone can get good at it without practice, and that may mean for some, like me, to write it out first.

For all of the above reasons it may be a disservice to post a written call sheet unless it is used like the answers in the back of a math textbook: to confirm that you did the work correctly and arrived at the same result.

Edited by user Sunday, September 10, 2017 6:03:31 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
Offline rclad  
#13 Posted : Sunday, September 10, 2017 5:56:52 PM(UTC)
rclad

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I forgot to add a quip by a famous author who once wrote (this may be paraphrased), "I would have written a shorter letter, but I didn't have time." It takes time to find the most concise way to describe something.

In addition to brevity, the order of the words used to call an element, or combination of elements in a figure, is critical as well. It would be helpful to have a class just on calling.
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
Offline Bill Teeter  
#14 Posted : Sunday, September 10, 2017 7:01:12 PM(UTC)
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Greg - when I started in Basic 10 years ago I had written call sheets. So don't think I have never been where you are at. I quickly learned after a couple of years that I needed to do it with the Aresti (and a stick plane). Like you I pick them apart at the beginning of each season and figure out which way the partial rolls have to go to bring me out in the right directions. My Aresti diagrams all have R's and L's and other notations that accomplish much the same as your "training wheels" so I do get it.

All that to say I understand but with time you will become more and more proficient at doing it from the Aresti. It is great that you are working with Ray who is a very accomplished pilot and are practicing. Calling Unlimited Unknowns is baptism by fire. It is not easy at first. Keep at it, it gets easier. I also know that Ray is a great guy and won't yell at you for making a mistake LOL.

As for a class on calling it is certainly an acquired skill. Matter of fact the best callers I ever had were women and not pilots. Consistent language between caller and pilot is imperative of course and you have already picked up on the brevity aspect. It is clear from what has been posted that different pilots know maneuvers by different terminology.

I learned a long time ago not to argue with Wayne and no doubt he is technically correct, however if you called #2 in Sportsman 2018 a Half Loop I would likely have a mental block. I admit that I stand corrected by Wayne and apologize for misleading you, but I would still ask my caller to call an Immelman with 2 of 4 entry.

Edited by user Sunday, September 10, 2017 7:16:19 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

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rclad on 9/10/2017(UTC)
Offline rclad  
#15 Posted : Sunday, September 10, 2017 9:27:37 PM(UTC)
rclad

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Ray is a great IMAC mentor for new pilots like me. He pointed out every fault in my flying and calling, but did so in a positive way. He also took time to be there and let me fly at his field as a guest when mine was unavailable this weekend.

I have to trust you that calling will get easier with time. Right now "baptism by fire" sounds about right!
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
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