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Offline rclad  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, October 3, 2018 2:15:13 PM(UTC)
rclad

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The FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 just passed the Senate. How will that impact the 2019 sequences? AMA says it will take time for the FAA to set the rules that will put the 400' ceiling into affect. Meanwhile....?
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
Offline Krzy4rc  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, October 3, 2018 2:41:06 PM(UTC)
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I understand the 400' rule is only in place for Class G airspace. But that it gives the FAA the authority to put more restrictions in place.
Rich
Krzy4RC
SC-ARD (Louisiana)
IMAC Newsletter Editor
Team Jeti
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Offline Mike Karnes  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, October 3, 2018 2:43:12 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: rclad Go to Quoted Post
The FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 just passed the Senate. How will that impact the 2019 sequences? AMA says it will take time for the FAA to set the rules that will put the 400' ceiling into affect. Meanwhile....?


Greg until we are told that NO ONE even those under the CBO umbrella by AMA can not break the 400' altitude level. We will keep going as we have for the last several years. Section 336 had altitude restrictions. We should hope that this Re-authorization Act will let us continue status quo.

What we need to continue to do it make sure your local clubs don't try to enforce things they are not required to.
You need to make sure you attend your club meetings and keep them from creating 400 foot cap to your field.
WE ARE NOT THE FAA POLICE - SO WE ARE NOT THE ENFORCERS OF FAA RULES.

Clubs panicking will cause more issues than the Act will.



Mike Karnes
President
karnes1025@gmail.com
317-716=6220

thanks 5 users thanked Mike Karnes for this useful post.
Dangerous Dan on 10/3/2018(UTC), tl3 on 10/3/2018(UTC), Matt Komar on 10/3/2018(UTC), rclad on 10/3/2018(UTC), Orthobird on 10/3/2018(UTC)
Offline Brad  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, October 3, 2018 3:41:12 PM(UTC)
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As the president of my local club, my plan is to:
  • Wait for the President to sign the act into law.
    Contact the municipal airport manager that is just over 5 miles away from my field;
    Find out what they think we need to do to keep flying the way we've been flying for the past 10 years;
    Hopefully sign some kind of memorandum with them that details what our responsibilities are to help them out, and not have to worry about a specific 400' limit that cannot be measured by us from the ground.


Our history with the airport has been that they know we're here, they don't want to worry about additional distractions for air traffic controllers, and we've never had a problem.

Brad
Offline Kevin  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, October 3, 2018 4:02:13 PM(UTC)
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As the President of our club I plan to do.... nothing. :)

I will encourage the members to continue to fly in a safe and responsible manner.

We have a meeting this Thursday, we will discuss it, but I will remind them that we are not the FAA, we don't need to be the FAA police, and we will watch and wait to see what the AMA's statements are after the President signs the Bill.

From there we will try to follow those guidelines, but not to panic.

Kevin
thanks 1 user thanked Kevin for this useful post.
Vicente Bortone on 10/8/2018(UTC)
Offline rclad  
#6 Posted : Wednesday, October 3, 2018 4:10:59 PM(UTC)
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That's a relief to hear that IMAC - and the sequence committee - are not going to make any immediate changes based on this new bill.

Our field already has a 900 foot ceiling because of a nearby private airstrip. I don't think I can fly the Intermediate sequence much lower than that!
Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
Offline Orthobird  
#7 Posted : Wednesday, October 3, 2018 7:29:23 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: rclad Go to Quoted Post
That's a relief to hear that IMAC - and the sequence committee - are not going to make any immediate changes based on this new bill.

Our field already has a 900 foot ceiling because of a nearby private airstrip. I don't think I can fly the Intermediate sequence much lower than that!


I have installed a altimeter on two of my aircrafts. The real time telemetry I believe is accurate. It will give me two actual elevations.

I can display the actual altitude. SO when I am in shreveport, it will actually read 279 feet. When I took my airplane to Abilene, Texas, it read 1700 feet. SO i knew this thing works.

It also will display the relative altitude. So when I am in abilene, and the aircraft was on the ground, it read the relative altitude as 1 feet.

reason I am telling you this is, that when I fly the advanced sequence, as soon as I take off, within 2 seconds, the aircraft is at 500 feet, and I take off scale like! LOL.

When I do a hammerhead, it will read the relative altitude is 1700 feet.

reason I am telling you all this is, we underestimate how high we are getting. We are getting way higher in feet, than most people think. Just fun information!
Wish I could fly everyday!
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rclad on 10/3/2018(UTC), Dean Bird on 10/4/2018(UTC)
Offline chymas  
#8 Posted : Wednesday, October 3, 2018 8:40:03 PM(UTC)
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I see and hear people saying if we aren't in class G airspace we are okay.... Time to grab a sectional and get up to speed on airspace. Airspace is designated as A, B, C, D, E which are all around airports or restricted areas EVERYTHING ELSE IS CLASS G from the ground up.

Ya there's a few other details to at but this is the bread and butter of it.
Clark Hymas
North West Regional Director
PNW Aircrafters - Precision Crafted Aerobatic Models proudly produced in the USA
Offline rclad  
#9 Posted : Wednesday, October 3, 2018 9:36:55 PM(UTC)
rclad

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Originally Posted by: Orthobird Go to Quoted Post
I have installed a altimeter on two of my aircrafts. The real time telemetry I believe is accurate. It will give me two actual elevations.

I can display the actual altitude. SO when I am in shreveport, it will actually read 279 feet. When I took my airplane to Abilene, Texas, it read 1700 feet. SO i knew this thing works.

It also will display the relative altitude. So when I am in abilene, and the aircraft was on the ground, it read the relative altitude as 1 feet.

reason I am telling you this is, that when I fly the advanced sequence, as soon as I take off, within 2 seconds, the aircraft is at 500 feet, and I take off scale like! LOL.

When I do a hammerhead, it will read the relative altitude is 1700 feet.

reason I am telling you all this is, we underestimate how high we are getting. We are getting way higher in feet, than most people think. Just fun information!


Thanks! Yes, I think an altimeter is useful to have, not just to satisfy curiosity and help avoid ceiling restrictions, but it also helps to learn what a true horizontal line looks like in the air. It can also help with safety issues, if there are trees you need to avoid. At one contest I re-programmed my base altitude alert to 150 feet to stay above the 100 foot trees surrounding the airfield.

I've flown as high as 1200 feet with my 30% Extra, and it looked very small - too small! - at that altitude. I imagine even a 42% plane would look tiny at 1700 feet!

Greg Hladky
Flying on a wing and a purpose...
and physics, power, practice, preparation, plans...
and pioneers who pushed the envelope!
Offline Toby W. Silhavy  
#10 Posted : Thursday, October 4, 2018 8:54:39 PM(UTC)
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A7246FC2-BEA0-4600-B5E2-CDF8BF61064A.jpeg (129kb) downloaded 9 time(s).

Hopefully there is some hope in our future BigGrin
Toby Silhavy
“Chase the dream, not the competition “
2018 IMAC WORLD TEAM USA MEMBER
USA USA USA USA 🇺🇸
thanks 5 users thanked Toby W. Silhavy for this useful post.
rclad on 10/5/2018(UTC), Chuck Edwards on 10/5/2018(UTC), Michael Verzwyvelt on 10/5/2018(UTC), Jim7216 on 10/6/2018(UTC), Orthobird on 10/7/2018(UTC)
Offline Brad  
#11 Posted : Friday, October 5, 2018 6:39:28 AM(UTC)
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I look forward to seeing if the FAA can get that through their lawyers.

Brad
Offline heliperry  
#12 Posted : Friday, October 5, 2018 8:44:55 AM(UTC)
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Thanks Toby for posting this information, we are all keeping a close eye on the subject. Blink
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Toby W. Silhavy on 10/5/2018(UTC)
Offline Paul Deppe  
#13 Posted : Saturday, October 6, 2018 8:30:40 PM(UTC)
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For general info: Just received these two e-mails from the FAASafety.gov web site:

FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018
Notice Number: NOTC8077
On October 5, 2018 the President signed the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018. Section 349 of the Act establishes new conditions for recreational unmanned aircraft use and immediately repeals the Special Rule for Model Aircraft (section 336 of Pub. L. 112-95).
The agency is evaluating the impact of this change in the law and how implementation will proceed. Section 349 cannot be fully implemented immediately. FAA employees will continue to follow all current policies and guidance with respect to model aircraft operations.
Updated direction and guidance will be provided as the Agency implements this new legislation.

FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018
Notice Number: NOTC8078
On October 5, 2018, the President signed the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018. The Act establishes new conditions for recreational use of drones and immediately repeals the Special Rule for Model Aircraft.
The agency is evaluating the impacts of this change in the law and how implementation will proceed. The Reauthorization Act cannot be fully implemented immediately, please continue to follow all current policies and guidance with respect to recreational use of drones:
• Fly for hobby or recreation only
• Register your model aircraft
• Fly within visual line-of-sight
• Follow community-based safety guidelines and fly
within the programming of a nationwide community-
based organization
• Fly a drone under 55 lbs. unless certified by a community-
based organization
• Never fly near other aircraft
• Never fly near emergency response efforts
Updated direction and guidance will be provided as the FAA implements this new legislation.
thanks 4 users thanked Paul Deppe for this useful post.
rclad on 10/7/2018(UTC), Dangerous Dan on 10/7/2018(UTC), Toby W. Silhavy on 10/7/2018(UTC), Walter Royster on 10/8/2018(UTC)
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